wrrench:

YOU ARE THE DANCING QUEEN
YOUNG AND SWEET ONLY SEVENTEEN

image

OH YEAH

(via talkingincursive)

catgoddess:

awwww-cute:

Get away from my food! Wait… You’re… Really Fluffy

*Pat pat pat pat*

catgoddess:

awwww-cute:

Get away from my food! Wait… You’re… Really Fluffy

*Pat pat pat pat*

(via mymompickedthisurl)

Eating cookies naked in bed cause why the fuck not.

thefuuuucomics:

shout out to IMDb for always reminding me where i recognise that actor from

(via theforceisstrongwiththistimelord)

I let you live once, princess.
I am not a princess.

(via theforceisstrongwiththistimelord)

spookshowvixens:

1982 was the absolute height of the slasher Golden Age and saw the release of 33 slasher films.  This is also when the law of diminishing returns sunk in and audiences began to grow a bit weary of the formula which was a bad sign for the future of the sub genre.

This year saw the release of further sequels to both “Halloween" and "Friday the 13th" which would try new things.  In the case of "Halloween III: Season of the Witch" that experiment actually took it out of the slasher category and turned it into something else which angered the fans who wanted to see more of Michael Myers but instead got a plot by modern day druids to sacrifice children to old gods by way of high technology. Due to the failure of this film, it would be another 6 years before another sequel would be made and Michael Myers would be back to his old tricks again.

Much more successful was “Friday the 13th Part 3 3-D" which helped usher in the second wave of 3-D films.  A gimmick once popular in the 1950s, 3-D came back with a slightly updated process. This also cemented the look of the killer Jason Voorhees that became associated with the series from that point onward.

A few other notable slasher films of 1982 were:

Madman" directed by Joe Giannone.

Alone in the Dark" directed by Jack Sholder.  This was the first film made by New Line Pictures who had been just a distribution company.  It was a failure financially but got them into the horror genre which would eventually save their studio.

The Dorm That Dripped Blood" directed by Stephen Carpenter and Jeffery Obrow.

Pieces" directed by Juan Piquer Simon.

Girls Nite Out" a.k.a. "The Scaremaker" directed by Robert Deubel.

and my personal favorite:

The Slumber Party Massacre" directed by Amy Holden Jones. This movie is unique in that it was written as a parody of slasher by noted feminist Rita Mae Brown. Roger Corman decided that it needed to be filmed as a straight slasher though and brought in Ms. Jones to do that. All of the jokes are left in as written but played absolutely deadpan, which leaves a very odd and surreal feeling.  Both of the sequels to this film would also be written and directed by women, making it the only (to my knowledge) female-helmed slasher franchise in existence.

(via memoriastoica)